Back Pain
Chiropractic
Lower Back Pain
Lumbar Pain
Massage Therapy
Muscular Weakness
Myofascial Release (MFR)
Pain
Rolfing Structural Integration

Who should I see about my back pain?

3 Answers

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A physical therapist is a great provider to see for spine pain, especially if it is non-traumatic (ie no concern for fractures. PTs are experts in musculoskeletal issues, specifically spine pain. We use a variety of tools to address spine pain including dry needling, joint specific mobilizations, soft tissue mobilizations, proprioception training, strengthening, movement control, and activity modification to help get you back to the things you want to do ASAP.

As suggested below, a massage therapist is a great addition to your treatment team. But doing only soft tissue work doesn't necessarily set you up for long-term success in avoiding future episodes. Strength and movement control is an essential component of low back health.


IHCNT specializing Eastern Medical Massage to treat women aged 35-60 with low back pain from child birthing, athletics, or career activities dramatically reduce their pain in as few as three treatment

First you should see a doctor or chiropractor to ensure that it isn't a disc issue. If they clear you for massage, then I would recommend seeing a massage therapist specializing in Medical/Orthopedic Massage or Tuina.


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